How Long Does Demerol Stay In Your Blood?

Medically Reviewed by Johnelle Smith, M.D on March 15, 2021

Use of Demerol can be detected in the blood for up to 24 hours on average. This timeframe can vary based on certain genetic and personal factors.

Medically Reviewed by
Johnelle Smith, M.D on March 15, 2021
How Long Can Demerol Be Detected In The Blood?

After taking Demerol, the drug can remain detectable in the blood for up to 24 hours, or one day after last use. This is an average estimate.

Specialized blood tests can be used to detect the use of synthetic opioids like Demerol, fentanyl, and tramadol.

Demerol is a fully synthetic opioid. It will not be detected in standard drug tests, due to how it metabolizes in the body.

Demerol Detection Time In Blood

Use of Demerol can be detected in the blood for up to 24 hours on average.

Millions of people receive prescriptions for drugs like Demerol each year. Demerol, the brand name for meperidine, belongs to a class of drugs known as opioid analgesics.

Demerol is a central nervous system depressant that can affect heart rate, blood pressure, breathing rate, and pain sensation.

Factors that can affect the amount of time Demerol stays in the blood include:

  • drug tolerance
  • drug dependence (i.e. from frequent use/drug abuse)
  • taking multiple drugs
  • metabolic rate
  • impaired liver and kidney function
  • hydration

People who have become physically dependent on Demerol may have a buildup of the drug in their system. This can extend the detection window.

Taking higher doses of Demerol or abusing it with other drugs—such as benzodiazepines or alcohol—can also affect how long it takes for enzymes in the body to metabolize Demerol.

How To Get Demerol Out Of Your Blood

The only way to get Demerol out of your blood is to stop taking Demerol. Drinking a lot of water isn’t a reliable way to get drugs out of your system, contrary to popular belief.

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If you’ve developed a dependence on Demerol, stopping it may be difficult. Trying to stop it all at once may cause uncomfortable symptoms of withdrawal, such as vomiting and diarrhea.

Demerol Withdrawal And Detox

If you’ve become physically dependent on Demerol, seeking medical support through a drug detox program is highly recommended. This is the safest way to stop taking Demerol.

Medical detox programs for Demerol can offer:

  • 24-hour support
  • medical supervision
  • medicine for withdrawal symptoms
  • treatment referrals

Demerol dependence can also be a sign of drug abuse and addiction.

If you’re addicted to Demerol, a medical professional may recommend additional substance abuse treatment following detox.

Treatment For Demerol Abuse And Addiction

Demerol is a synthetic drug that can be habit-forming and addictive in some people. If you or a loved one is misusing Demerol, treatment for opioid abuse may be recommended.

Treatment options for Demerol abuse and addiction include:

  • inpatient rehab
  • medications for opioid use disorder (e.g. methadone, buprenorphine, naltrexone)
  • behavioral therapies
  • chronic pain management in conjunction with other treatments

Abusing opioids like Demerol have dangerous side effects. Without treatment, abusing a drug like Demerol can have long-term consequences on health and general well-being.

It’s never too soon or too late to seek help for opioid addiction. Call our helpline today to find addiction treatment for Demerol near you.

This page does not provide medical advice. See more

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