Heroin Withdrawal Home Remedies: Are They Safe?

Medically Reviewed by Johnelle Smith, M.D on July 13, 2021

Quitting heroin is notoriously uncomfortable and difficult, but some individuals will prefer to go through withdrawal in the comfort of their own home. For those seeking withdrawal home remedies, a few options are available.

Heroin Withdrawal Home Remedies

The simple answer is that yes, many popular home remedies for heroin withdrawal are considered perfectly safe.

However, you should always consult with your physician before taking any over-the-counter medications or vitamins for heroin withdrawal as they can conflict with other medications. This is especially true for someone who has pre-existing conditions.

And withdrawing from heroin at home is not for everyone. Those who need medical care or who are at greater risk of relapsing may need to seek a medical detox program to avoid complications.

Learn more about heroin withdrawal treatment

Over-The-Counter Medications As A Heroin Withdrawal Home Remedy

Heroin is known for having very difficult withdrawal symptoms, but there are over-the-counter medications available to combat some of these symptoms.

Examples of over-the-counter medications used for heroin withdrawal include:

  • NSAIDS to reduce fever and chills (aspirin and ibuprofen)
  • loperamide for diarrhea (Imodium)
  • ondansetron for nausea and vomiting (Zofran)

None of these medications will make the pain of withdrawal go away completely, but they can help to alleviate some of the more uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms.

Always take these medications exactly as directed. It is recommended that you speak with your physician before taking any OTC medications to avoid dangerous drug interactions.

Vitamins And Herbs As A Home Remedy For Heroin Withdrawal

For those who prefer to go a more natural route to treat withdrawal symptoms, certain herbs and vitamins are available which have shown promise in alleviating heroin withdrawal symptoms.

Examples of vitamins and herbs used for heroin withdrawal include:

  • St. John’s wort for shaking, diarrhea, and insomnia
  • valerian root for insomnia and anxiety
  • melatonin for insomnia
  • passion flower for anxiety, insomnia, and stress

The effectiveness of these more natural remedies, however, is not a sure thing and some will feel their effects much more than others.

Natural herbs are not monitored by the FDA (United States Food & Drug Administration).

It is especially important to consult with a physician before taking them, as they can have dangerous interactions with other medications.

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Alternative Medicine As A Home Remedy For Heroin Withdrawal

Some studies have shown acupuncture to be an effective method for both treating the symptoms of heroin withdrawal and reducing cravings.

The effectiveness of this technique is still up for debate, but acupuncture has been known to cause the release of dopamine in the body and provide relaxation.

Both dopamine release and relaxation can help make the process of withdrawal more manageable.

Lifestyle Changes As A Heroin Withdrawal Home Remedy

Heroin has an unfortunate way of zapping a person’s natural ability to create endorphins and dopamine within their own body.

Fortunately, there are plenty of easy and enjoyable ways to get these natural pain relievers and pleasure inducers back up and running.

Examples of lifestyle changes for heroin withdrawal include:

  • exercising regularly
  • eating healthy
  • meditating regularly
  • spending more time outside
  • maintaining a healthy sleep schedule
  • finding a good support system

These activities may be uncomfortable at first, so it is important to go slow or at a pace that works for you.

Over time, practicing good self-care can work wonders towards feeling better after any form of addiction.

When To Seek Professional Help For Heroin Withdrawal

Anyone who has ever attempted to quit heroin cold turkey or with home remedies will tell you firsthand how difficult it is.

It is important to know that seeking professional help after an attempt to quit on your own does not mean that you failed.

Always keep in mind that heroin withdrawal is extremely difficult, even when being treated at a specialized addiction treatment center.

Still, medically supervised detox is usually the best option when trying to avoid relapse.

Professional treatment for heroin withdrawal will typically include:

  • medically supervised detox
  • individual and group therapy
  • nutritional and exercise programs
  • follow-up and aftercare

Heroin recovery can be an ongoing process that lasts several months and even years. Anyone who is looking for long-term success should consider getting addiction treatment at a professional rehab facility.

Further, for anyone who has a pre-existing medical condition, especially one which involves their heart or lungs, it is never recommended to go through withdrawal at home.

Finding Treatment For Heroin Addiction And Withdrawal

Whether you are trying to quit heroin on your own and are simply seeking advice or you are seeking professional treatment for yourself or a loved one, we can help.

The call you make to our helpline is 100% free and confidential, and our trained representatives can guide you in all things related to addiction and substance use disorders.

We are committed to helping you find an individualized heroin treatment plan that works for you, so you can go on to leading a fulfilling, drug-free life.

This page does not provide medical advice. See more

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Medically Reviewed by
Johnelle Smith, M.D on July 13, 2021
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