Is Suboxone Treatment Free?

Medically Reviewed by Johnelle Smith, M.D on July 14, 2021

Suboxone is an effective treatment for opioid addiction, which affects an estimated 1.6 million Americans. While the cost of Suboxone treatment isn’t free, some health insurance plans may fully cover or partially cover Suboxone treatment costs.

Medically Reviewed by
Johnelle Smith, M.D on July 14, 2021
Is Suboxone Treatment Free?

Suboxone is a medication that is FDA-approved as a medication-assisted treatment for opioid use disorder, in combination with behavioral therapy.

The cost of Suboxone treatment is not free, but it may be fully covered or partially covered by health insurance, depending on the type of insurance you have and the plan type.

Some drug rehab centers also offer free or low-cost Suboxone treatment for people addicted to opioids who are very low-income or meet other eligibility requirements.

Learn more about taking Suboxone during medication-assisted treatment

The Cost Of Suboxone Treatment

Suboxone treatment is an effective treatment for opioid use disorder and heroin addiction, and the cost of receiving this treatment can vary.

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, buprenorphine (Suboxone) treatment in an opioid treatment program can cost $115.00 per week, or $5,980.00 a year, for twice-weekly visits and medication.

The cost of Suboxone treatment will vary based on:

  • health insurance: Having health insurance may reduce or even fully cover the cost of Suboxone treatment, depending on the type of health plan you have.
  • treatment setting: The cost of Suboxone treatment can vary based on where you receive treatment and whether you take Suboxone alone or in conjunction with therapy.
  • eligibility for sliding scale: Some people who earn a very low income or have no income may be eligible for assistance or sliding scale fees to help cover Suboxone.
  • Type of treatment: The cost of Suboxone treatment will vary depending on whether it also involves additional treatment services.

Select rehab centers in the United States offer free or low-cost treatment programs for people addicted to heroin or other opioids. Not all free rehab centers may offer Suboxone treatment.

Does Insurance Cover Suboxone?

Most health insurers in the United States offer coverage for Suboxone treatment, or treatment with its generic equivalent (buprenorphine/naloxone).

Whether your insurance company covers Suboxone treatment may depend on the type of insurance plan you have and the Suboxone treatment provider you choose.

Under federal law, health insurance companies and group health plans are required to provide the same level of coverage for substance use services as they do for medical treatment services.

Frequently Asked Questions About The Cost Of Suboxone

It’s common to have questions about the cost of Suboxone treatment for opioid addiction. Find answers to some of the most frequently asked questions here.

❓ Does Medicaid Cover Suboxone Treatment?

✔️ Suboxone treatment is eligible for Medicaid coverage. Coverage for Suboxone treatment with Medicaid varies by state and will depend on the type of Medicaid coverage you have.

Prior authorization and other eligibility requirements may apply.

Learn more about Medicaid coverage for Suboxone treatment

❓ Is Suboxone Free With Medicare?

✔️ Suboxone is covered by some Medicare Part D and Medicare Part C (Medicare Advantage) policies.

The cost of Suboxone with Medicare health insurance will depend on the type of health plan or policy you have.

❓ How Much Does Suboxone Treatment Cost Without Insurance?

✔️ If someone does not have health insurance, they may be responsible for covering the full cost of Suboxone treatment. Not all Suboxone treatment providers accept self-pay.

People without health insurance may qualify for cost assistance in order to receive Suboxone treatment, depending on their annual income and other qualifying factors.

The cost of Suboxone treatment without insurance will depend on:

  • the Suboxone treatment provider
  • the Suboxone treatment setting (e.g. outpatient, inpatient)
  • annual income of the patient

❓ How Much Does Generic Suboxone Cost?

✔️ Generic versions of Suboxone (buprenorphine/naloxone) are available and are typically lower in cost than brand-name Suboxone.

The cost of generic buprenorphine/naloxone will likely be lower than Suboxone, but the exact cost will depend on health insurance coverage and the specific Suboxone treatment provider.

❓ Is There Cost Assistance For Suboxone?

✔️ Cost assistance for Suboxone treatment may be available for those who qualify.

Cost assistance programs are offered by some private insurers and may be available for people without health insurance through a third-party organization or patient assistance program.

❓ Is Suboxone Treatment Worth The Cost?

✔️ Data from cost benefit studies show that medication-assisted treatment for opioid use disorder offers several cost-saving benefits in the long run, including:

  • reduced healthcare costs
  • reduced criminal justice system costs
  • greater income earned
  • better quality of life
  • reduced risk of relapse and fatal overdose

While treatment for opioid addiction isn’t free, research on the effectiveness of MAT shows that it is largely cost-saving and can help people rebuild a healthy life in recovery.

Call Today To Find Free Suboxone Treatment

If you’re looking for free or low-cost Suboxone treatment for yourself or a loved one, we can help.

By calling our helpline, we can:

  • verify your insurance
  • see if you qualify for free Suboxone
  • help you find Suboxone treatment near you

Call our helpline today to learn more about the cost of Suboxone treatment and to find a Suboxone treatment program that’s within your budget near you.

This page does not provide medical advice. See more

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