Mixing Cocaine And Adderall: Side Effects And Risks

Medically Reviewed by Johnelle Smith, M.D on October 11, 2021

Cocaine and Adderall are both stimulants that can become very dangerous when taken at the same time. Together, they pose serious short-term and long-term risks and can even be potentially fatal.

Dangers Of Mixing Adderall And Cocaine

Cocaine and Adderall are sometimes taken together because they work in similar ways and tend to amplify each other’s effects.

Both cocaine and Adderall are stimulants. Cocaine is an illegal street drug, while Adderall is a prescription medication used to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy.

While Adderall is generally safe when taken as prescribed, it can be abused and is known to be habit-forming.

Cocaine, on the other hand, is dangerous in itself but can become even more so when taken with other stimulants like Adderall.

Find out more about the dangers of taking multiple drugs at the same time

Why Do People Mix Cocaine And Adderall?

Because they have similar effects, it is most likely that people mix cocaine with Adderall because they enjoy the feeling either one gives and they want to experience stronger effects.

They may also simply want to prolong the effects of cocaine by mixing it with a drug that lasts much longer.

It is also possible that someone would accidentally mix cocaine and Adderall without knowing they were at risk.

This could be the case if someone had a prescription to Adderall they were taking daily and they used cocaine recreationally.

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What Happens When You Mix Cocaine And Adderall?

When taking cocaine and Adderall together, a person will likely experience an intense burst of energy along with a sense of euphoria. This is because stimulants often cause the brain to release more dopamine.

During this time, a person will also likely feel more alert and aware of their surroundings — hence why Adderall is used to treat ADHD and narcolepsy.

Unfortunately, as the cocaine and Adderall’s effects start to wear off, the person will experience a crash as their dopamine levels suddenly drop.

To counteract this “coming down” period, some may find themselves taking more in order to continue their high instead.

Side Effects Of Using Cocaine And Adderall Together

Because both cocaine and Adderall are stimulants, they are known to increase alertness and attention while creating an overall sense of well-being.

They both also potentially have some very unpleasant side effects.

Side effects of cocaine include:

  • bloody nose
  • anxiety
  • chest pain
  • insomnia
  • diarrhea
  • trouble breathing
  • nausea

Side effects of Adderall include:

  • headaches
  • loss of appetite
  • dry mouth
  • insomnia
  • increased blood pressure
  • nervousness
  • stomach pain

Risks Of Mixing Cocaine And Adderall

Mixing cocaine with Adderall can have serious consequences, potentially resulting in an overdose and even death.

This is the case especially for those who have pre-existing conditions involving their heart. For these people, it would be a serious risk to mix these two stimulants together even once.

Immediate risks of mixing cocaine and Adderall include:

  • stroke
  • heart attack
  • chest pain
  • high blood pressure
  • high heart rate
  • seizure
  • coma
  • panic attacks

Mixing cocaine and Adderall also poses serious health risks when used together consistently over time.

The consequences of using these substances together can be both mental and physical, potentially leading to depressive and anxiety disorders in addition to permanent physical damage.

Long-term risks of mixing cocaine and Adderall include:

  • substance use disorder
  • painful withdrawal
  • brain damage
  • respiratory problems
  • insomnia
  • weight loss
  • aggression
  • paranoia

Cocaine And Adderall Abuse Can Lead To Addiction

Cocaine and Adderall are both addictive substances in and of themselves, and a substance use disorder involving both would be very difficult to break away from.

Both substances affect the dopamine levels in the brain, causing crashes that lead to repeated use.

Repeated use then leads to tolerance and dependency as the person requires more of the drug to keep their high going.

Addiction to two or more substances at once can be especially dangerous and is known as polysubstance abuse. Fortunately, there is treatment available.

Finding Treatment For Cocaine Addiction

If you or a loved one is currently struggling with addiction or substance abuse, please consider calling our helpline.

We would love to help you find treatment for polydrug abuse near you. Call today to learn more.

This page does not provide medical advice. See more

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Medically Reviewed by
Johnelle Smith, M.D on October 11, 2021
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